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Monosodium phosphate 22.5% phosphorus

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Balanced Equine Monosodium phosphate is a quality source of phosphorus supplementation for horses - human food grade - 22.5% phosphorus You can choose between a net weight of 2.9 kg and 4.9 kg. 2.9 kg is the maximum amount allowed in a 3 kg satchel and 4.9 kg for a 5 kg satchel as the packagin ...Read more
AUD73.50 each
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Balanced Equine Monosodium phosphate is a quality source of phosphorus supplementation for horses - human food grade - 22.5% phosphorus

You can choose between a net weight of 2.9 kg and 4.9 kg. 2.9 kg is the maximum amount allowed in a 3 kg satchel and 4.9 kg for a 5 kg satchel as the packaging is counted by Australia Post.
Currently the 2.9 kg size is out of stock.

An ideal way to supplement phosphorus without adding additional calcium. Especially useful for intakes that are already high in calcium. Very low iron, recommended by Dr Eleanor Kellon VMD. www.drkellon.com

10 grams will provide 2.25 grams phosphorus

Monosodium phosphate is a nutritional supplement product for inclusion in horse's feed. Product has no therapeutic effect and is designed to be administered in a feed for voluntary ingestion for horses.

For orders greater than 15 kg email This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
I'll look up the cheapest postage based on your postcode.

For orders outside of Australia, please email This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. for product prices - tax (GST) and shipping costs.

Horse consumption only.

Background information

Phosphorus along with calcium and Magnesium are known as the major minerals. Copper, zinc, iron, manganese, selenium and iodine are trace minerals. In a horse’s nutrient intake, either phosphorus  can be at too low a level compared to the NRC (National Research Council) daily recommendations AND/OR the calcium to phosphorus ratio can be too high. Whichever one applies, the diet won’t be optimal.