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2% Biotin 450 g

biotin
Net weight: 450 g 2% Biotin: 1 gram = 20 mg biotin Balanced Equine 2% Biotin is a premium grade concentrated biotin, 20000 mg/kg. Check the levels of biotin in other products, this product is far more concentrated and will be far more economical. Net weight = 450 g. Biotin: Has a r ...Read more
AUD30.00 each


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Net weight: 450 g 2% Biotin: 1 gram = 20 mg biotin

Balanced Equine 2% Biotin is a premium grade concentrated biotin, 20000 mg/kg.

Check the levels of biotin in other products, this product is far more concentrated and will be far more economical. Net weight = 450 g.

Biotin: Has a role in general metabolism and in maintaining integrity of skin, hair and hooves.

Recommended feeding rate is between 10 to 20 mg biotin per day.

The water soluble B vitamin biotin is a nutritional supplement product for inclusion in horse's feed. Product has no therapeutic effect and is designed to be administered in a feed for voluntary ingestion for horses.

Horse consumption only.

For orders outside of Australia, please email This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. for product prices - tax (GST) and shipping costs.

Biotin assists chemical reactions in the body including synthesis of protein for keratin formation. Biotin and the rest of the B vitamins are manufactured by gut microorganisms and can come from the diet in the form of fresh grass. There are a number of studies that show that biotin can improve hoof quality but other studies found no change at all with biotin supplementation. Biotin only helps if there is a deficiency to start with. For horses that are mainly on pasture, it’s less likely for a deficiency to exist and even more so if the horse is also fed biotin sources like grains, brans and seed meals. However if the diet contains a lot of grain, biotin is more likely to be deficient as high grain diets in cattle have been shown to increase the acidity in the rumen, decreasing the activity of bacteria that synthesise biotin. This may well occur in horses.

Biotin (a water soluble B vitamin) has been shown to have a beneficial effect on insulin signalling by moving glucose from the bloodstream into cells without raising insulin levels. 

Good explanation: Biotin and Type II Diabetes, what to know
http://www.siliconvalleyfit.com/blog/bid/350740/Biotin-and-Type-II-Diabetes-what-to-know (first paragraph).

Some examples of studies:

Geyer H, Schulze J (1994)  The long-term influence of biotin supplementation on hoof horn quality in horses   http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/8202678

Josseck H, Zenker W, Geyer H (1995)  Hoof horn abnormalities in Lipizzaner horses and the effect of dietary biotin on macroscopic aspects of hoof horn quality  http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/7556044

Reilly JD, Cottrell DF, Martin RJ, Cuddeford DJ. (1998)  Effect of supplementary dietary biotin on hoof growth and hoof growth rate in ponies: a controlled trial  http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/9932094

Interesting article on the benefits of biotin:
Research Review: Biotin and its Effects on the Hoof Wall http://www.horsesandpeople.com.au/article/research-review-biotin-and-its-effects-on-the-hoof-wall#.VsOZD_l97IW

Another viewpoint:
Hoof Treatments
http://www.doctorramey.com/help-hooves/